Fearful Odds

Hey
Welcome ...

My name's Guy. I've been called a polymath, which I think is what was meant when someone else called me easily distracted. Not that I've been storing quotes about me, but another friends said of me 'you don't think like other people, do you, Guy?' Which is true, and both a blessing and a curse.

Having bailed out of uni in 1980ish (Pure and Applied Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, great for meeting girls) I walked into an Army Recruiting office in Huddersfield. Long story. 'S'pose you want to be a Paratrooper too?' said a bored bloke in green. 'No,' I want to fly helicopters.' 'Oh?'. We got to the bit about qualifications. 'Wait there,' he said and disappeared. Out came a burly S'nt Major. 'Come with me, son.' I was ushered behind the scenes. 'You don't wanna fly choppers,' he said and explained why. 'You wanna join the Intelligence Corps.' 'Oh. What do they do?' 'Can't tell you, son.' I feel I was tricked.

Seven years as an Arabic and Spanish linguist, seven years at Heathrow in operations and customer services, didn't the various plagues of Egypt come in seven year cycles?, twenty in IT as a programmer, architect, tester, early exponent of Extreme Programming, an early exponent of Data Warehousing ... have I lost you yet? I thought I'd self destruct and give depression a go.

A big dog came into my life in curious circumstances and kept me alive for an October '14 diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis to explain a lot about the difficulties of the past and forget full time IT consultancy for the future. So here came the recalibration. Now, no more sport (I played high level rugby and hockey and love, ahem, cricket), no more outward bound stuff in the Black Mountains. I became forced by god / the universe / fate whatever, to admit to myself who and what I really am.

Poet. My name's Guy and I am a poet. 11 more stages to go.

Oh, by the way. Try paying the bills as a poet ...

Now I live in Cheltenham, am on an MA with some amazing people and am building a charity using dogs to help alleviate some of the negative effects of cPTSD.